LOST SISTER featured on Snowflakes in a Blizzard

I wish to thank editor Darrell Laurant for featuring my novel LOST SISTER on his website Snowflakes in a Blizzard. Darrell approached me with this idea, having found LOST SISTER on Amazon. In the blizzard of books available to us now, he aims to showcase works of merit and reintroduce them to the public. Please visit his website to discover more good reads and become acquainted with their authors. You can read about Darrell’s mission here, and don’t miss that last line. I love his vision, his kindness and his wonderful sense of humor.

Mothers and Other Creatures: A bioStories Anthology

As a writer, I strive for economy, precision and beauty. As a reader, I look for the same qualities; if I don’t find them, I’ll abandon the book.
I just read Mothers and Other Creatures: A bioStories Anthology, and I cannot recommend this book highly enough. Every story is genuine, moving and memorable, and the writing is first-rate, free of superfluity. Kudos to the talented contributors and many thanks to editor Mark Leichliter for culling such a fine collection. Please visit his website, bioStories, to read more excellent essays.

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“Manatee Gardens” on LgbtSr.org

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OUTER VOICES INNER LIVES, edited my Mark McNease and Stephen Dolainski, is a captivating anthology of short stories by LGBT writers over fifty. My story “Manatee Gardens” is included in this collection and appears today in lgbtSr.org.

Many thanks to Mark for the good work he does for our community as well as his continuing support of my work. For those interested in first-rate mysteries and short fiction, please check out Mark’s Amazon page.

The Writer’s High

I have finished writing another short story. The world is not waiting for this story, I do not anticipate payment (certainly nothing commensurate with the effort), and readership will likely be modest, assuming I find a publisher. Still, I am elated.

Why? If not for payment or acclaim, why do we write? What sustains us? What accounts for the gratification?

It is not hope. When we are fully engaged in our writing, what time is there for hope? What use is hope?

Nor is it pride. While we may be pleased with our stamina and resolve, we know that our talent will always fall short of our vision, and we accept this. We write anyway.

Spiritual leaders teach us that pleasure dependent on nothing is the only pleasure that lasts. I think our writerly thrill comes from this mysterious, inviolable place, beyond the reach of fame and fortune and everything else that comes and goes. This is the answer to our effort, this very private bliss. For as long as we live, for as long as we write, we have access to it.

I once attended an excellent reading by a famous author. Afterward, someone in the audience asked this woman if she had a blog. The author said no, explaining that she had made a promise to herself to never write anything for free. You have to admire that kind of integrity, but I wonder: How can she resist?